Between an X-Bolt and a Tikka Rifle, which is better?

I'm a normal North Dakota hunter that loves deer hunting but needs to get a new rifle. My dad and I are planning on getting me a Browning X-Bolt (243 WIN) but we can't find any (Browning is backed up by a lot). Today was I talking with a friend at school and he told me to get a Tikka bolt action (270 WIN). My dad said no cause Tikka's aren't that accurate.

How reliable are those 2 guns in those calibers and which 1 would be better for North Dakota white tailed deer hunting (with a lucky Elk hunting)

Also: We're looking for synthetic stocks, not wood.

10 Answers

  • The Browning A-Bolt and X-Bolt are a tier above the Tikka T-3 for build and with the A-Bolt Composite Hunter at $600 or under it makes sense to get Browning. It might help that I own A-Bolts in 30-06 and 300 WSM,both shoot Sub-MOA with my loads,but factory was very acceptable. I've had the 30-06 for 20 years with zero issues,the WSM is a Stainless Stalker. The composite stock Browning uses isn't a cheap thing like entry level Remington ADL or SPS rifles. I like the X-Bolt's new trigger and safety system,but I do like the A-Bolt magazine system. I think the As look trimmer too. And the triggers are adjustable easily-and both of mine break cleanly.

    The Tikka is a good rifle;barrel is by Sako,and they are slick,never heard an owner complain;but the Bolts are just enough better.

    As for cartridge;if you even think of elk hunting the 243 isn't to be considered. You are going to be better served with a 270,7mm-08,7mm Rem Mag,308 or 30-06 even for deer-especially larger north country deer. I mention 7mm Mag because it is pretty much equal to 30-06 for powder loads and with the smaller diameter bullets at 160 grains it can use you get great ballistic and sectional density numbers-with maybe a pound more recoil if that. I see nearly as many 7 Mags in the field for elk as 30-06. I don't recommend 300 Mags often,the 9 or more grains of powder used isn't gaining you enough to utilize when measured against the recoil. I can do direct comparisons with my rifles-the WSM was a gift so I use it,but the 30-06 is pleasant compared to it after a 20 round session.

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    RE:

    Between an X-Bolt and a Tikka Rifle, which is better?

    I'm a normal North Dakota hunter that loves deer hunting but needs to get a new rifle. My dad and I are planning on getting me a Browning X-Bolt (243 WIN) but we can't find any (Browning is backed up by a lot). Today was I talking with a friend at school and he told me to get a Tikka bolt...

  • Take a good look at the Tikka T3 and compare it to the notorious Remington 770. Yeah, they are built in a similar fashion. They use a piece of pipe for a receiver - instead of a real machined receiver.

    So sorry, but Tikka just doesn't make my list of decent quality rifles. Not with the Ruger 77 rifles out there selling for the same money - only made in the USA and built to last a lifetime.

    If you can't find an X-bolt, then my second choice would be a Weatherby Vanguard. In my mind the Tikka is just a throw-away. I don't own one and I never will.

  • Tikka Rifle

  • I'd go with the X-Bolt, not just because I own A-Bolts but because the X-Bolt has a newer trigger and safety system,the ergonomics for me are slightly better and in the long run I feel the Browning is a better investment. I also like the recoil pad on the X-Bolt. The T-3 is a fine rifle that uses some LEAN manufacturing principles for cost control, the way it is made is very similar to the Remington 788 with the small bolt port and round stock receiver that is also used by the Savage Axis and Ruger American. The T-3 is built by SAKO and has a great barrel but overall the build specs and quality go to the Browning,especially when you compare the synthetic stock or the wood stock models side by side;the Browning near select wood and the better composite stock win out.

  • I would have to go the Tikka T3. I know that the stock is a bit plastic looking, however they are tuff and the magazine has never given me a problem. The action is super smooth and overall it is a nice slick firearm. As for accuracy my .223 T3 lite is sub MOA with a crappy nikko sterling night eater scope using handloads. My .308 T3 varmint has done <1" @ 300m, with hand loads and a bushnell 6400 elite scope.

    I was using my friends browning A bolt the other day. It too was a nice rifle, but i found the trigger a little stiffer (the Tikka has an adjustable trigger) and the bolt had a rotating inner sleeve, which i believe will just attract dirt and grime and make it harder to clean.

    I sold my remington VSSF in 22.250Rem because my .223 Tikka lite was out shooting it. Enough said.

    Both rifles are good, but I prefer the T3

  • Browning X Bolt 270

  • Seeing as Tikka T3's (the one you will be talking about) are guaranteed sub-MOA I'd call that plenty accurate. More accurate than most shooters are. They come in .243 as well. Detachable mags and the option of 5 Rounders. I'd take the Tikka but I do prefer them. Used to cost NZ $2700 for a stainless/synthetic T3 with a Leupold 3-9x40 and over barrel suppressor.

  • pi would recommedn browning over tikka simply because based on my experience ( i have not shot the tikka but others i read seem pretty much married to them so that speaks volumes to me about them). I personally dont like plastic stocks on guns because i think they make them look cheap.

    Now for deer and a possible elk the .270 is the way to go. a .243 is fine for deer but it is light for elk. very light actually. i would go with a browning x-bolt in .270 for your area of the country

  • screw all that go for reliability accuracy and knock down power with very managable recoil. remington 700 in .308 winchester or 7mm-08. i say those because a .30 caliber bullet will kill anything you want as long as shot placement is good. besides white tail deer are just german shephards with hooves and horns. And 7mm bullets carry comparable ballistic qualities as the .30 cal but the recoil has been just about cut in half

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