Does Battery acid eat through clothing in the washer or dryer?

My Husband works with car batteries. His work clothes go into the washer in tack and tend to come out of the dryer with holes in them. Is the battery acid he most likely gets on his clothes working eating the cotton in the washer or dryer and can I avoid this somehow without ever seeing a stain to treat? By the way, it never eats holes in the polyester shirts only the cotton pants/shorts!

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    RE:

    Does Battery acid eat through clothing in the washer or dryer?

    My Husband works with car batteries. His work clothes go into the washer in tack and tend to come out of the dryer with holes in them. Is the battery acid he most likely gets on his clothes working eating the cotton in the washer or dryer and can I avoid this somehow without ever seeing a stain…

    Source(s): battery acid eat clothing washer dryer: https://tr.im/gw8Qx
  • Battery Acid On Clothes

  • Yes, it’s probably the battery acid. It weakens the fabric so it gets destroyed by the action of the washer. Cotton would be more affected than a synthetic. There is no way to treat a splash of battery acid so it won’t eat fabric unless you do it right away by neutralizing the acid with an alkaline substance like baking soda. I’m guessing that your husband is not going to stop work 10 times a day to do that even if he’s aware of exactly when he gets a bit of battery acid on his clothes. Only solution is for him to wear some protective clothing over his regular clothes.

  • Battery acid does not need to go through the washer or dryer to eat through clothing. It will do that on its own. Putting the clothes through the washer only makes the fabric (where the acid was) wash away faster. Treating it will not make the acid NOT eat through the clothes.

    Cotton is more susceptible to the acid since cotton is a natural fiber and polyester is a man-made fiber (mainly plastic ingredients.)

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    Depends on battery type. If you are talking about AA and AAA “sealed” nickle Cadmium cells then they are probably simply discharged. The danger here is they can reverse polarize. (Positive becomes negative). Check with a volt meter to see if there is any voltage and that polarity is not a problem. Then charge 120% to fully charge them and they will likely be fine. There is nothing to lose in trying and everything to gain!

  • Never thought too much about that

  • why are all the answers so short these days?

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