what exactly is a sea scallop and why are they so expensive?

i wanted to make a recipe that called for them but had to scratch that when I saw the price of scallops.

12 Answers

  • Their are two kinds of scallops Sea Scollop's and Bay Scollop's They are mollusc's and are shaped like tiny thick hockey pucks. They are expensive depending on where you live and by which time of year you buy them. Here on the east coast they are not too expensive I will only eat fresh scollop's but they sell canned ones and I have a very hard time telling the difference it is not as profound as the difference between canned corn and fresh or frozen corn, Canned scallop's are cheaper than fresh try them no one will be able to tell the difference when you use them as an ingredient.

  • Canned Scallops

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    RE:

    what exactly is a sea scallop and why are they so expensive?

    i wanted to make a recipe that called for them but had to scratch that when I saw the price of scallops.

  • Skip the sea scallops and U-10's. The bigger they get the more expensive AND bitter they get. Bay scallops are less expensive and have a wonderfully sweet taste. So don't scrap the recipe quite yet!

  • all of those wonderful and informative answers neglected to mention one critical piece of information; Do not buy wet pack scallops at anywhere near dry pack prices.

    Scallops do dehydrate rapidly and the commercial solution is to add STP [ sodium tripolyphosphate] so that the scallops retain water and don't lose weight on the way to your local market. STP does something else more insidious it absorbs water so a scallop can increase it's weight on the way to market.

    You wind up paying a lot of money for a cheap ingredient- water.

    in addition when you saute or grill an STP scallop they tend to explode and then deflate

    Buy only dry pack scallops

  • Sea scallop are expensive due to the fact that people actually go out to sea to catch them.

  • a sea scallop is the real deal. Today if it is not a sea scallop it can come pressed from a ray.

  • SCALLOP

    The scallop is possibly best known for its beautiful and distinctive shell. It has been captured in works of art by Titian, Botticelli, and many others. Buildings in ancient Pompeii were decorated with scallop-shell ornaments.

    Scallops are bivalve mollusks with scallop-edged, fan-shaped shells. The shells are further characterized by radiating ribs or grooves and concentric growth rings. Near the hinge, where the two valves (shells) meet, the shell is flared out on each side forming small "wings". Just inside each valve along the edge of the mantle is a row of short sensory tentacles and a row of small blue eyes. (Maybe you've heard of the book Stalking the Blue-Eyed Scallop, by Euell Gibbons). The shells are oƿє-ṅєd and closed by a single, over-sized adductor muscle which is sometimes referred to as the "eye".

    The eye, or adductor muscle is the part of the scallop we eat here in the U.S. In Europe, the entire scallop is eaten. The adductor muscle is more developed in the scallop than in oysters and clams because scallops are active swimmers. They glide freely through the water and over the sea floor by snapping their shells together.

    Scallops are primarily harvested by dredging and are shucked soon after capture. They cannot hold their shells closed; therefore, once they are out of the water, they lose moisture quickly and die. Consequently, they're shucked on board the ships, placed in containers, and refrigerated.

    CULINARY DESCRIPTION

    The sea scallop (Plactopecten magellanicus) is the largest of the scallops. You usually get approximately 20-40 in one pound. They can be bought fresh or frozen. Scallops freeze well, so if they are on sale or you buy too many, freeze them for later use. The raw meats are creamy white in color and sometimes slightly orange due to the food (algae) they consume. Scallops have a distinct, sweet odor when they are fresh.

    There are many ways to prepare scallops. Always take care not to overcook them; they toughen easily. As soon as they lose their translucence and turn opaque, they are done, Sea scallops may be broiled, kabobed, stir- fried, baked, or microwaved. There are many recipes for scallops. If you plan to put them in a sauce, it's best to cook the scallops and the sauce separately and then combine them; otherwise, water will cook out of the scallops and make your sauce runny.

    The bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) resides in bays and estuaries from New England to the Gulf of Mexico. Its muscle reaches about one-half inch in diameter. You usually find about 50-90 in one pound. Bay scallop meats are white with some pink coloration on occasion due to the food (algae) they consume.

    You need to be especially careful when cooking bay scallops. Because of their size, they tend to overcook very easily and will become tough. They are sweet and tender yet firm when cooked properly. Bay scallops may be baked, sauteed, stir-fried, or microwaved. If you need cooked scallops for a seafood salad, simply wash and dry one pound, then wrap them deli- sandwich style in a microwaveable paper towel, and microwave on HIGH for 3 minutes. You will have perfectly cooked scallops. Or else, you may prefer a more traditional recipe such as Coquilles Saint-Jacques, a creamy scallop recipe found in many cookbooks. This favorite can even be used as an appetizer before an elegant repast.

  • SCALLOP

    The scallop is possibly best known for its beautiful and distinctive shell. It has been captured in works of art by Titian, Botticelli, and many others. Buildings in ancient Pompeii were decorated with scallop-shell ornaments.

    Scallops are bivalve mollusks with scallop-edged, fan-shaped shells. The shells are further characterized by radiating ribs or grooves and concentric growth rings. Near the hinge, where the two valves (shells) meet, the shell is flared out on each side forming small "wings". Just inside each valve along the edge of the mantle is a row of short sensory tentacles and a row of small blue eyes. (Maybe you've heard of the book Stalking the Blue-Eyed Scallop, by Euell Gibbons). The shells are oƿє-ṅєd and closed by a single, over-sized adductor muscle which is sometimes referred to as the "eye".

    The eye, or adductor muscle is the part of the scallop we eat here in the U.S. In Europe, the entire scallop is eaten. The adductor muscle is more developed in the scallop than in oysters and clams because scallops are active swimmers. They glide freely through the water and over the sea floor by snapping their shells together.

    Scallops are primarily harvested by dredging and are shucked soon after capture. They cannot hold their shells closed; therefore, once they are out of the water, they lose moisture quickly and die. Consequently, they're shucked on board the ships, placed in containers, and refrigerated.

    CULINARY DESCRIPTION

    The sea scallop (Plactopecten magellanicus) is the largest of the scallops. You usually get approximately 20-40 in one pound. They can be bought fresh or frozen. Scallops freeze well, so if they are on sale or you buy too many, freeze them for later use. The raw meats are creamy white in color and sometimes slightly orange due to the food (algae) they consume. Scallops have a distinct, sweet odor when they are fresh.

    There are many ways to prepare scallops. Always take care not to overcook them; they toughen easily. As soon as they lose their translucence and turn opaque, they are done, Sea scallops may be broiled, kabobed, stir- fried, baked, or microwaved. There are many recipes for scallops. If you plan to put them in a sauce, it's best to cook the scallops and the sauce separately and then combine them; otherwise, water will cook out of the scallops and make your sauce runny.

    The bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) resides in bays and estuaries from New England to the Gulf of Mexico. Its muscle reaches about one-half inch in diameter. You usually find about 50-90 in one pound. Bay scallop meats are white with some pink coloration on occasion due to the food (algae) they consume.

    You need to be especially careful when cooking bay scallops. Because of their size, they tend to overcook very easily and will become tough. They are sweet and tender yet firm when cooked properly. Bay scallops may be baked, sauteed, stir-fried, or microwaved. If you need cooked scallops for a seafood salad, simply wash and dry one pound, then wrap them deli- sandwich style in a microwaveable paper towel, and microwave on HIGH for 3 minutes. You will have perfectly cooked scallops. Or else, you may prefer a more traditional recipe such as Coquilles Saint-Jacques, a creamy scallop recipe found in many cookbooks. This favorite can even be used as an appetizer before an elegant repast.

  • a bay scallop is not a scallop at all it is a cusk fish and they use a cookie cutter

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